The math of Ferguson: percentages don’t show how bad it really is

Being A Better Scientist

The other day, I was talking to my colleague Dr Scott Roy. We were working on the second midterm exam for our genetics class at SF State, but got distracted. We started talking about the DOJ report on Ferguson and especially the numbers in the report about racial bias. These are some of the numbers we talked about:

  • 67% of the population in Ferguson is black.
  • Blacks account for 85% of vehicle stops.
  • Blacks account for 90% of citations.
  • Blacks account for 93% of arrests.
  • Blacks account for 95% of “Manner of Walking in Roadway” charges.
  • Blacks account for 94% of all “Failure to Comply” charges.
  • Nearly 90% of documented force used by FPD officers was used against African Americans.
  • Blacks account for 100% of dog bites.
  • Blacks account for 96% of cases where someone was arrested by FPD only because of an outstanding municipal warrant.

So, from reading…

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Consent: Not actually that complicated

rockstar dinosaur pirate princess

http://kaffysmaffy.tumblr.com/post/780535517 http://kaffysmaffy.tumblr.com/post/780535517

A short one today as my life is currently very complicated and conspiring against my preference to spend all of my days working out what to blog. But do you know what isn’t complicated?

Consent.

It’s been much discussed recently; what with college campuses bringing in Affirmative Consent rules, and with the film of the book that managed to make lack of consent look sexy raking it in at the box office. You may not know this, but in the UK we more or less have something similar to ‘affirmative consent’ already. It’s how Ched Evans was convicted while his co-defendant was not – and is along the lines of whether the defendant had a reasonable belief that the alleged victim consented. From the court documents it appears that while the jury felt that it was reasonable to believe that the victim had consented to intercourse with the co-defendant, it…

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Nathaniel Robert Walker: Architecture and food

Architecture Here and There

Courtesy of the Both illustrations courtesy of Maison d'Ailleurs, Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland Illustrations courtesy of Maison d’Ailleurs, Yverdon-les-Bains, Switzerland

My friend Nathaniel Walker, who got his doctorate at Brown last spring and now teaches architectural history at the College of Charleston, has contributed this essay.

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From the Ground Up: How Architects Can Learn from the Organic and Local Food Movements

By Nathaniel Robert Walker

As a supporter of traditional urban design and a believer in the contemporary relevance of traditional architecture, I cannot count the number of times I have heard generally well-meaning, otherwise reasonable people say the words: “Well, we cannot pretend that we are building in the nineteenth century.”  This statement envelops within its svelte hide a veritable swarm of debatable assumptions, many of which lie at the heart of global architecture culture’s current malaise.

I find it is usually useless to attack these assumptions directly by asking complicated questions such as “What is it about symmetry or…

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